When it comes to covering with adequate bandwidth homes located in less developed suburban or rural areas, “one size does NOT fit all”.

The lower costs of wireless distribution networks has been progressively offset by costs associated with real estate costs for siting equipment as well as by the growing cost of the core network landline connectivity to fulfill the growth in bandwidth demand at the network edge.

A plethora of access solutions: WiFi, WiMax, CBRS, and, in different flavors dependent on standards and marketing, 2.5 G, 3G, 4G, 4.5G, LTE, and soon 5G will be available to address growing demand. All these require proper integration and interfacing with core network standards such as DOCSIS, IETF and relevant standards; ITU, ETSI, ANSI, etc.

All these access solutions are potentially usable for fixed wireless, but they need a rational, well-thought out and coherent integration at the edges; where the devices seek access and at the core, where the analytics live (including Authorization, Authentication and Accounting).

Strategic Innovation at The Edge (SITE) Inc. approaches the challenge of multiple Radio Access Network (RAN) technologies integration with innovative business models, decentralized technology and service management principles. These allow, through local management, a tailored approach to the varied orographic and population densities, of different communities, leveling the playing field for broadband access and enabling connectivity to needed services: jobs, medical care, education and entertainment.

Our decentralized network and business models allow integrating at that elusive middle ground between center and edges, often not achievable by larger network and service providers, constrained necessarily by a nationwide strategic approach. Furthermore, our technology agnostic approach allows to pick the best technology solution between the standards possible, creating a portfolio of options.

We partner with innovating, flexible and lean companies to provide the highest level of “intelligence at the edge” of the network, customized, within standard solution, for the specific territorial needs.

Technology

Background

Broadband and Internet access have progressively been identified as a basic human right by organizations such as the United Nations. It has been identified as an enabler to the right of freedom of speech, and to the right to freedom of assembly.

According to a report of a United Nations commission dated September 2016, even though China and India are now the largest Internet markets on the planet, they are also among the six countries that together account for 55 per cent of the global ‘offline’ population.

Furthermore, 20 countries including United States, China and India make up almost three-fourths of the world population not using the Internet.

These findings suggest that targeted efforts in just a few key markets could help enormously in redressing the gaping ‘digital divide’ between those who are online and those still offline, said the International Telecommunication Union (ITU), a UN agency specialized in telecommunication standards.

Rural US homes telecommunication

servicing needs readdressing

United states large swaths of territory away from urban areas are underserved or, even worse, not served by decent speed Internet access (so-called broadband). This is, de facto, limiting constitutional rights of citizens, as well as stifling the ability to pursue the American dream.

The conventional service approach pursued in the US has been a physical connection to the home, driven by the progressive pervasiveness of copper pair based telephony service.

The copper pair, on extended distance and due to wiretapping required to serve multiple households, has soon revealed to be a poor medium to provide higher speeds (beyond a few hundred kbps, up to 1.5 Mbps). Fiber was the natural evolution, but still with the prohibitive cost of deployment that puts rural or suburban areas at a disadvantage in absence of government subsidies (like the ones that catapulted South Korea at the top of broadband speeds and penetration worldwide). According to the 2013 analysis by the Organization for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD), an international organization designed to stimulate world trade, the US then ranked 16th (down from 14th in 2010) for wired broadband penetration behind South Korea, Canada, and New Zealand.

Mobile wireless technologies have developed in multiple steps, privileging in order of priority (and expected revenue stream) voice traffic, territory coverage and, in urban areas, indoor penetration and, more recently, higher Internet speeds.

This trend, though, did not help enough the growth of suburban and rural home services development. In fact it was mostly oriented to mobile communications, or to quick solution within homes, leaving a gap on potential fixed wireless integrated distribution networks.

Service Innovation at The Edge (SITE) Inc. approaches this challenge with innovative business models, decentralized technology and service management principles allowing through local management a tailored approach to the varied orographic and population densities of different states, towns and counties across the United States, aiming to offer the same flexibilities within and beyond the country.

Our decentralized network and business models allow integrating at that elusive middle ground between center and edges, often not achievable by larger network and service providers, constrained necessarily by a nationwide strategic approach.

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